When Two Friends Walk Together

When two friends walk together,
When two friends walk together,
When two friends walk together and one falls,
The other helps him up.

But when someone walks alone,
When someone walks alone,
When someone walks alone and he falls down,
There’s no one to help him up.

If a rope has several strands,
If a rope has several strands,
If a rope has several strands and one strand breaks,
The others will hold fast.

When I’m walking with the Lord,
When I’m walking with the Lord,
When I’m walking with the Lord I need not fear.
He will not let me fall down,
He will not let me fall down,
He won’t let me fall down.

About This Song:
I always associate this song with my father. The week he died, he fell in my parents’ bathroom and wasn’t able to get up. My mother couldn’t lift him.

She called me and I rushed over from work, but he was too heavy for me as well. So we called the paramedics, who had no problem putting him on a stretcher and transporting him to the hospital.

The song–like many of mine–is based on Scripture: Ecclesiastes 4:9-12.

9 Two are better than one,
    because they have a good return for their labor:
10 If either of them falls down,
    one can help the other up.
But pity anyone who falls
    and has no one to help them up.
11 Also, if two lie down together, they will keep warm.
    But how can one keep warm alone?
12 Though one may be overpowered,
    two can defend themselves.
A cord of three strands is not quickly broken.
(NIV)

At first glance, that Scripture doesn’t sound “religious.” Those verses express truths that don’t appear to have anything to do with faith or God.

Yet the Scriptures–and consequently my song–have always seemed Christian.  Even before I added a new final stanza a few years ago (twenty-seven years after first writing the song), using an idea not based on Ecclesiastes.

As a whole, I think the lyrics describe the ultimate in Christian unity and fellowship: when a Christian helps to lift a fallen brother or sister; when a church as the body of Christ cannot be broken by the failure of one weak member.

So it’s not surprising that I view the second stanza as a sad reminder of the hopelessness of people who aren’t part of a church fellowship and have no one to depend on. Therefore it’s ultimately a call to be on the lookout for the fallen who may not even be part of the church fellowship–and to be willing to help.

Willingly. Without counting the cost.

I feel certain that–in the context of biblical history–verse 11 doesn’t have any sexual implications. But I preferred not to use it in my song rather than chance having someone snicker when they heard it.

Is there a time in your life when you’ve needed someone to lift you up? How about sharing a comment?

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

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About Roger E. Bruner

Roger Bruner worked as a teacher, job counselor, and programmer analyst before retiring to write Christian fiction full-time. A guitarist and songwriter, he is active in his church choir, church praise team, and nursing home ministry. Roger also enjoys reading, web design, photography, and spending time with his wonderful wife, Kathleen. Roger has twelve published novels. Four of them are the now-completed young adult Altered Hearts series, plus three other teen novels. Three are quirky romantic novels (as opposed to genre romance novels). The Devil and Pastor Gus is a speculative satire, and Rosa No-Name is a contemporary coming-of-age novel.
This entry was posted in Church, Ecclesiastes, Falling, Fellowship, Friend, Helping, Lifting, Rope and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to When Two Friends Walk Together

  1. Amos 3:3 KJV Can two walk together except they be agreed? This is my favorite verse! AND its right in line with what you have expressed! God Bless

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