Won’t You Tell Me About That Cross?

Won’t you tell me about that cross that’s hanging down from your neck?
Did you get it as a gift or purchase it for yourself?
Did you put it on by choice or wear it out of habit?
Won’t you tell me about that cross that’s hanging down from your neck?

Won’t you tell me about that cross you’re wearing as a necklace?
Do you often have it on or mostly keep it boxed up?
Is it just some pretty shape or does it have some meaning?
Won’t you tell me about that cross you’re wearing as a necklace?

Won’t you tell me about that cross you’re wearing upon your neck?
Do you like to dwell on it or take it much for granted?
Does it tell what you believe or is it merely jewelry?
Won’t you tell me about that cross you’re wearing upon your neck?

I wear this cross upon my neck to tell how God loves me.
I wear this cross upon my neck to show I love Him, too.
I wear this cross upon my neck to say that God loves you,
For His Son died upon a cross,
But He rose from death to give us life,
When we trust in Him.

About This Song:
Thanks to my former pastor, Randy Mathis, for making me think more seriously about the reasons people wear crosses.

If you’re like me, you probably see dozens of people wearing crosses–both men and women–during the course of the day. Some crosses are small. Petite. Some are large and heavy enough to ward off an attacker if the wearer took it off and swung it.

Some of them are quite plain. Some, like the crosses I’ve made for my wife and me, are wooden. Others aren’t just fancy; they’re fine jewelry. Probably quite costly.

Could you picture yourself taking part in the following conversation?

You: “You must be a Christian.”

Cross Wearer: “Why would you think that?”

You: “That cross you’re wearing. It’s outstanding.”

Cross Wearer: “Thanks, but it’s just a cross. No reason for you to get nasty and accuse  me of being a Christian.”

You: “But don’t you understand the significance of the cross?”

Cross Wearer: “I understand that you’re nuts. Get lost before I call a cop.”

Hmm. Not funny, is it? But isn’t that apt to be the way the conversation would go with many cross wearers–maybe even most of them?

This song addresses that issue–and gives the explanation.

I’m not suggesting that you go out and make enemies of every cross wearer you run into by coming on that strong, but I am asking you to evaluate your own reason for wearing a cross–if you do. Are you trying to identify yourself to other Believers? Or does the cross just happen to be the piece of jewelry you put on today?

How about leaving a comment

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

 

Roger

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About Roger E. Bruner

Roger Bruner worked as a teacher, job counselor, and programmer analyst before retiring to write Christian fiction full-time. A guitarist and songwriter, he is active in his church choir, church praise team, and nursing home ministry. Roger also enjoys reading, web design, mission trips, photography, and spending time with his wonderful wife, Kathleen. Roger’s young adult novels, Found in Translation and Lost in Dreams, came out in 2011. The Devil and Pastor Gus just came out, and he has eight unpublished manuscripts.
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2 Responses to Won’t You Tell Me About That Cross?

  1. NikeChillemi says:

    As I posted on Twitter to your post, I received my favorite cross from a Jewish friend. Someone gave it to her and she couldn’t wear it. She thought this somewhat heavy, but simple brass cross had a unique and beautiful design. So, she gave it to me.

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