I Don’t Show that I Trust Him

I know that this is a chair;
I believe that it can hold me.
But till I put my weight on it,
I don’t show that I trust it.

I know that this is a plane;
I believe that it can fly me.
But till I board to go some place,
I don’t show that I trust it.

I know that this is a pill;
I believe that it can cure me.
But till I put it in my mouth,
I don’t show that I trust it.

I know that this is a map;
I believe that it can guide me.
But till I plan a trip with it,
I don’t show that I trust it.

I know that this is God’s Word;
I believe that it can fill me.
But till I read and feed on it,
I don’t show that I trust it.

I know that Christ is God’s Son.
I believe that He can save me.
But till I let Him live in me,
I don’t show that I trust Him.
Till I let Him live in me,
I don’t show that I trust Him.

About This Song:
Most people are familiar with the old story about the tightrope walker preparing to walk across Niagara Falls. He asked, “How many people believe I can make it all the way across?” Everyone in the crowd raised their hands.

“And,” he added, “who’s willing to ride on my back?”

No takers.

Hmm. And why not? Not one among those hundreds of people who said they believed this guy could make it across Niagara on a tightrope actually had enough faith to put their lives in his hands.

Aren’t we like that at times, too? We say we believe God is able to do anything and everything. We believe He wants to provide for us and take care of us.

But when something is going wrong, how often do we rely on ourselves when we should be relying on God?

Unless we put our faith into practice, it’s useless.

What about you? Do you simply believe God is Who He says He is–even the Devil believes that–or are you willing to place your life totally in His hands? How about leaving a comment?

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

 

Posted in Chair, Faith, Niagara Falls, Pill, Plane, Tightrope Walker, Trust | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why Spend Money on Food?

Why spend money on food
That does not satisfy?
Why buy groceries
That don’t even give you strength?
If you’re hungry inside
For something that will fill,
Come eat from
The Living Bread of God.
It’s free!

About This Song:
You might not recognize these lyrics as Scripture, but they are–as put in my own words, that is.

Isaiah 55:2 says,
Why spend money on what is not bread,
    and your labor on what does not satisfy?
Listen, listen to me, and eat what is good,
    and you will delight in the richest of fare.
(NIV)

Why do you spend money for what is not bread,
And your wages for what does not satisfy?
Listen carefully to Me, and eat what is good,
And let your soul delight itself in abundance.
(NKJV)

Why spend money on what does not satisfy?
    Why spend your wages and still be hungry?
Listen to me and do what I say,
    and you will enjoy the best food of all.
(GNV)

Why do ye weigh money for that which is not bread? And your labour for that which is not for satiety? Hearken diligently unto me, and eat good, And your soul doth delight itself in fatness.
(YLT)

Although Isaiah speaks specifically about food, his meaning goes far beyond that. He’s talking about the search for satisfaction.

Not everything people indulge in to seek satisfaction is bad in and of itself. Eating in moderation for fun, for example, is fine. But it’s not truly satisfying, and if we overeat in our quest for satisfaction, all we’ll get is fat.

So why do we spend money on food–or anything else–that doesn’t satisfy?

Instead, why not invest our time and resources in things that will satisfy us?  Feeding the poor, going on volunteer mission trips to spread God’s Good News, and helping fellow believers who’re going through a hard time are just three of the endless possibilities that come to mind.

The satisfaction gained by doing things like those is eternal. It allows us to store up treasures in heaven.

How about sharing a comment?

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

 

Posted in Food, Living Bread, Money, Satisfaction, Spending | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

You Alone, O Lord

You Alone, O Lord

You alone, O Lord, are my rock and my refuge;
You alone, O Lord, can shelter me beneath Your wings.
You alone, O Lord, can stretch Your hands to protect me,
And make all my foes cringe before Your feet.

You alone, O Lord, are my shield and defender;
You alone, O Lord, can break the power of evil men.
You alone, O Lord, can put an end to their terror
And punish them for all their wicked ways.

When I lie down, I sleep in peace,
For in You alone I am secure, O Lord.
In You alone I am secure.

You alone, O Lord, are my shield and defender;
You alone, O Lord, can break the power of evil men.
You alone, O Lord, can put an end to their terror
And punish them for all their wicked ways.

About this song:
In January of 1991, the United States–the whole free world, actually–was on pins and needles waiting to see whether Iraq would respond to demands to withdraw from its forceful occupation of Kuwait. The United Nations had set January 15th as the deadline for Iraq to comply.

I’m sure I wasn’t the only person wondering and perhaps worrying about the possibility of our becoming involved in war in the Middle East.

But rather than continue to worry, I sat down in the living room with my Bible and started searching the Psalms for verses of reassurance. I came up with a number of them, but these were the most meaningful:

I will lie down and sleep in peace, for you alone, O Lord, make me dwell in safety. (Psalm 4:8)

He is a shield to all who take refuge in him. (Psalm 18:30b)

Break the arm of the wicked and evil man; call him to account for his wickedness that would not be found out. (Psalm 30:15)

You defend orphans and everyone else in need, so that no one on earth can terrify others again. (Psalm 30:18)

The next day, Operation Desert Storm began.

Even though Desert Storm has long since passed, terrorism–or at least the threat of it–seems to be a constant in modern life.

But God’s power and love and protection are an even greater constant. That realization brings the kind of peace nothing else can bring.

I hope you find that kind of peace under God’s wing as well. How about leaving a comment?

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

 

Posted in Desert Storm, God's protection, Iraq, Middle East, Operation Desert Storm, Psalms, Terror, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Peace on the Earth!

Peace on the earth!
Joy to the world!
Love to the universe
From all those who know the Lord.

We can’t live without the Lord.
We just can’t live
Without His love.
We just can’t live
Without the love
Of the Lord.

Peace in our hearts!
Joy in our souls!
Love from God’s presence in our lives
To all those who need the Lord.

You can’t live without the Lord.
You just can’t live
Without His love.
You just can’t live
Without the love
Of the Lord.

About This Song:
I’m not sure how obvious it is that “Peace on the Earth!” is a Christmas song, but that’s what I intended when I wrote it thirty or thirty-five years ago. And I didn’t write it as a solo song for myself, but with vocal parts for a small group.

I used a reel-to-reel recorder to record separately on two tracks. I recorded guitar on one track, dubbed bass guitar in with it, and recorded the group singing it in a worship service.

I thought it was a wonderful presentation. and–to this day–I lament the loss of that recording.

I’ve recently made a few changes and created a solo version with a MIDI-based accompaniment. If you’re interested in hearing it, go HERE and select “Peace on the Earth” from the drop down box. There’s also an option for the MIDI accompaniment without any singing.

Regardless of the history of this song and its recent changes, the important thing is that “Peace on the Earth!” reflects the joy I imagine the angels having when they announced Jesus’ birth to the shepherds in the fields.

May it bring peace and joy to you as well and challenge you to share God’s love with others.

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

Posted in Angels, Christmas, Joy, Love, Peace | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Almost You’re Smiling

Little baby in a manger,
Almost you’re crying.
Can it be you feel the coldness
Of the world You’ve come to?
Do you somehow miss the warmth
You left at home in heaven?
Little baby in a manger,
Almost you’re crying.

Little baby in a stable,
Almost you’re smiling.
Can it be you feel the joy
Of those who wait your coming?
Do you somehow know what hope
You’ve brought to earth from heaven?
Little baby in a stable,
Almost you’re smiling.

About This Song:
When we look at babies–even the tiniest of babies–don’t we sometimes imagine what they’re thinking or feeling at the moment?

In college, I was taught that thinking is impossible without language, because thinking involves talking silently to oneself. No baby is born with the knowledge of language. Any language. So it would make sense to assume that babies can’t think.

But still. . .what about Jesus? Wasn’t He an exception? After all, he was half-God. Couldn’t God the Father have “programmed” Jesus with some special abilities that went beyond normal human capabilities?

He undoubtedly could have, but I don’t believe He did. Being a fully normal baby–and growing into a fully normal human adult–was an important part of God’s plan. So I believe Jesus cried only when babies normally cry.

Yet if we had been there in the stable observing Jesus after his birth, wouldn’t we have been tempted to assign certain emotions to the looks we saw? Especially from our perspective of knowing who Jesus was and what he came to earth to do.

The ideas in this song are purely imaginary. I don’t believe Jesus had the knowledge of anything that would make him cry–or smile. But it’s still a thought-provoking song.

If you have any thoughts about these ideas, please leave a comment.

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

Posted in Baby, Christmas, Cold, Crying, Jesus' birth, Jesus' Humanity, Smiling, Warmth | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Special Brand-New Sun

The Lord is so giving and forgiving.
Long years ago He made a wondrous star to shine
On a world so lost in death and darkness,
Yet still it leads to a manger bed of hope.
Yet still it leads to a manger bed of hope.

The Lord is so merciful and tender.
He made a special brand-new sun to rise and shine
On a world lost in death and darkness
And guide our footsteps in His path of peace.
And guide our footsteps in His path of peace.

The Lord is so merciful and tender.

About This Song:
This is one of my several original Christmas songs, although I’ve written two or three songs that talk about both Christmas and Easter.

When we think about the Star of Bethlehem, we usually think about the so-called wise men–the Magi–who followed the star from the east. The Bible includes these references:

Matthew 2:2
and asked, “Where is the one who has been born king of the Jews? We saw his star when it rose and have come to worship him.” (NIV)

Matthew 2:7
Then Herod called the Magi secretly and found out from them the exact time the star had appeared. (NIV)

Matthew 2:9
After they had heard the king, they went on their way, and the star they had seen when it rose went ahead of them until it stopped over the place where the child was. (NIV)

Matthew 2:10
When they saw the star, they were overjoyed.
(NIV)

When I did a Bible search on “star” in the four Gospels, I was shocked to discover that the Scriptures didn’t say anything about the shepherds seeing the star above the stable. No wonder I’d always thought otherwise, though. The typical Nativity Scene features shepherds and wise men worshiping Jesus together around the manger.

In reality, the wise men didn’t arrive on the scene until a year or two later. Mary, Joseph, and infant Jesus were no longer in the stable.

Although the first stanza of this song references the Christmas star, the second stanza refers to Luke 1:78-79:

78 because of the tender mercy of our God,
    by which the rising sun will come to us from heaven
79 to shine on those living in darkness
    and in the shadow of death,
to guide our feet into the path of peace.
(NIV)

I’ve watched a wonderful video that explained the Star of Bethlehem as a natural phenomena. Such a scientific explanation of the star in no way diminishes my faith or my fascination with the star as a special sign, however.

If anything, a scientific explanation makes the story of the star even more special. Would a star just happen to reveal Jesus’s exact location unless God had arranged the circumstances for it to happen?

No way do I consider that a coincidence.

What about you, though? What are your thoughts about the Star of Bethlehem? How about leaving a comment?

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

 

Posted in Bethlehem, Christmas, Magi, Mercy, Shepherds, Star, Sun, Tenderness, Wise Men | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

It Is Easier

It is easier to doubt than to believe;
It is easier to worry than to hope.
It is easier to fear than to trust,
Than trust in the name of the Man who’s more than man.

It is easier to hurt than to be whole;
It is easier to be blind than to see.
It is easier to suffer than to pray,
Than pray in the name of the Man who’s more than man.

It is easier to stumble than to run;
It is easier to lose than try to win.
It is easier to die than really live,
Than live in the name of the Man who’s more than man.

It is easier to to die than really live;
It is easier to suffer than to pray.
It is easier to fear than to trust,
Than trust in the name of the Man who’s more than man.

About This Song:
Do you know someone who finds it easier to gripe about his problems than to do something about them? You wouldn’t happen to be like that, would you?

I admit it. At some points in my life, I’ve found it easier to complain about my circumstances than to figure out how best to endure and possibly even overcome them.

Maybe that was because I didn’t want to admit that my problems were beyond my ability to control. They were God-sized, not Roger-sized.

Believing that God can solve our problems takes faith, though. A lot of it at times.

Especially when we admit that God’s solutions may not happen as soon as we want or in the way we want. Sometimes He chooses to help us endure our circumstances rather than to change them.

Who wants a God like that?

I do. Because I believe God knows so much more than I do. His wisdom is infinite. I can’t begin to comprehend how He keeps track of billions of people simultaneously and knows every detail of our lives, down to the number of hairs on our heads.

But I believe He does, and I believe He’ll work things out for His ultimate good. Not just mine or ours.

When Jesus lived on earth two thousand years ago, He didn’t simply do a lot of teaching, preaching, and healing. By enduring every possible problem we humans can possibly face, he showed us that victory can be ours.

Not victory through His own efforts, but through the love and wisdom and power of God the Father. Jesus modeled the kind of faith we need to live victorious lives.

The way He lived wasn’t easy, though, and He didn’t promise us an easy road, either. But He assured us of the ultimate victory, and that’s what counts.

If you haven’t yet put your faith in Jesus–the Man who’s more than man–won’t you do so now?

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again next Wednesday.

Best regards,
Roger

Posted in Complaining, Easiness, Faith, God's Provision, God's Voice, God's Wisdom, Negativity, Success, Suffering, Victory | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment